What Sort of Alexander Technique Student Are You?

I want to tell you a story about The Sheepish Student and The Industrious Student.

Once upon a time there were two students. The first student came to her lesson every week, and when the teacher asked her how she was getting on, she would give a sheepish smile and say, “I’m sorry, I’ve been that busy I’ve not had a chance to think about it.”  She did this week after week after week.  She and the teacher enjoyed the lessons enormously.

The second student would go home after her lesson and work industriously at what she had learnt. She thought about the ideas, she talked about them with her friends, she read the homework, she tried out the ideas in the things she did every day.  She did this week after week after week.  She and the teacher enjoyed the lessons enormously.

How quickly did our two students learn the Alexander Technique?

The first one: Really Slowly.

The second one: Really Fast.

Old-fashioned morality tales aside, what was the difference?   My colleague Nicola Dobiecka sums up very nicely(*) three major components for learning this work:-

  • We are prepared to change.
  • We’re prepared to learn how to stop doing things the way we’ve done them in the past.
  • We are prepared to take the time needed to do this.

Take another look at no. 3: We are prepared to take the time needed to do this.

It’s not an easy thing to ask. You’re working long hours, you have loads of commitments, your home life is busy. However, if you want this to work it means more than just turning up once a week to lesson.  Like my industrious student, you need to find the time to think, to experiment, to ponder.   Each think, each experiment, each ponder doesn’t take long, no more than a few moments.

But it does require you to step back from your usual whirl of busyness.

(*) http://www.reasontochange.co.uk/what-is-the-alexander-technique/the-alexander-technique-is-not-a-quick-fix/

Image courtesy of ulleo via Pixabay.com

 

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CNHC and ITM registered Alexander Technique teacher.

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in Alexander thinking, change, everyday life, progress

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